March 2021 program

March 2021 Zoom Program:
Toward Right Relations with Indigenous People – A 3 session series

  • Dates and times:
    • Monday, March 8, 2021, 7:00 to 8:30 pm
    • Saturday, March 20, 2021, 9:00 am to noon
    • Saturday, March 27, 2021, 9:00 am to noon
  • Format: Zoom, with videos, panel presentations, and small group discussions.
  • Participant handout: Click on RIGHT RELATIONS HANDOUT to view and download a PDF document with more information about this series, including links to resources and an extensive recommended reading list.

January 2021 program: Systemic Racism

  • Date and time: Two sessions:
    • Session 1 — Monday, January 11 2021, 7:00 to 8:30 pm MST
    • Session 2 — Tuesday, January 12, 2021, 7:00 to 8:30 pm MST
  • Format: Zoom, with videos and small group discussions.
  • Participant handout: Click on this HANDOUT link for the January program handout.

March 2020: Intersectionality

Title: Intersectionality: How “isms” are leveraged
Date: Monday, March 2, 2020, BUUF
Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location: Raible Room (at the east end of the north wing)
Program description:
There are a lot of obstacles to equity and justice. Intersectionality is a prism for understanding different forms of personal and societal discrimination. How can we change the outcome without understanding all the facets of the problem? Join us to help explore how our identities and relationships intersect.
Click here to download the program materials

February 2020: White Fragility

Title:          White fragility: Why white people can’t talk about race
Date:         Monday, February 4, 2020, BUUF
Time:         6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location:   Raible Room (at the east end of the north wing)

Program description:
Understanding why white people can’t talk about race involves recognizing the insulated conditions of racial privilege. This privilege frames and reinforces white assumptions of racial well-being. It protects white people from the racial stressors that would occur if they engaged in dialogue.

Click here to download the program materials

December 2019: Implicit Bias

Title: Implicit bias: The “good/bad binary” and beyond
Date: Monday, December 2, 2019, BUUF
Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location: Raible Room (at the east end of the north wing)
Program description:
As we work to comprehend our racial identity and how white supremacy is perpetuated, we can be derailed by our own adaptations, particularly the “good/bad binary” and implicit bias.
Click here to download the Session Handout
Program goals:
Increase awareness and understanding of white privilege and join together in an open dialog about the topic, including:

  • What is implicit bias?
  • What does it look like day-to-day? What benefits/advantages does it bring?
  • What can each of us do as individuals to counter our implicit biases

November 2019: Institutional Racism

Title: The white foundation of institutionalized racism: whiteness, white culture & white privilege
Date: Monday, November 4, 2019, BUUF
Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location: Raible Room (at the east end of the north wing)
Program description:
To work skillfully in deconstructing white supremacy, it helps to understand the foundations that support it – our whiteness as a race, white culture and the white privilege our culture perpetuates.
Click here to download the Session Handout
Program goals:
Increase awareness and understanding of white privilege and join together in an open dialog about the topic, including:

  • What is white privilege?
  • What does it look like day-to-day?
  • What benefits/advantages does it bring?
  • What can each of us do as individuals to counter white privilege?

October 2019: Indigenous Peoples

Title: Indigenous Peoples: Discovering the real stories of America
Date: Monday, October 14, 2019, BUUF
Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Location: Raible Room (at the east end of the north wing)
Program description:
You may know that in 1492 Christopher Columbus landed in the Bahamas, but do you know the name of the native people who greeted him? With video presentations by Native Americans Gregg Deal and Nancy Marie Mithlo, we’ll better understand how Native American stories have been lost, ignored or perverted by white culture, and we can honor the real stories of indigenous Americans.
Click here to download the Session Handout